Call for Pilot Project Applications

 

The Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation Consortium (CMCRC) is now accepting applications for pilot projects. See CMCRC pilot project application instructions and forms.

Application due date: April 1, 2022

Anticipated project start date: August 1, 2022

Pilot project funding is intended to

  • Foster novel/early ideas within and outside awarded CMCRCs 
  • Develop or incorporate new technologies as they become available
  • Encourage collaborations among members of different centers and between the CMCRC and outside investigators (although research collaborations with existing centers are not required)
  • Allow maximum flexibility for the advancement of exciting high-risk, high-reward projects

 

NEWS OF NOTE

 

  • 110 Female Students Awarded Scholarships Under the IAEA Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship Program (MSCFP). The Program provides financial support towards tuition and living costs for a master’s program and then arranges for up to a year of internship for the graduates to gain practical experience. Fellows are placed as interns at the IAEA or with partner organizations or industry players, in line with their area of study and interest. The fields of study pursued by this year’s students span many nuclear disciplines, from nuclear energy, nuclear science and applications, nuclear safety, security, non-proliferation and nuclear law. The students come from 77 countries –  almost three quarters come from developing countries. Congrats to all the awardees!

 

 

 

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

 

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  • Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Systematic Testing of Radionuclides in Preclinical Experiments (STRIPE) (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)(NOT-CA-22-026) National Cancer Institute. This Notice is to inform the research community that the National Cancer Institute intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to solicit applications for the Systematic Testing of Radionuclides in Preclinical Experiments (STRIPE) program. The STRIPE program seeks to support pre-clinical research projects utilizing state-of-the-art cancer biology methods and model systems that study how radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) agents affect the biology of normal tissue, tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Ideally, proposed aims will be designed to test hypotheses on how RPT dynamically impacts cancer biology processes, which can serve as the pre-clinical basis for developing new targeting strategies and approaches. 

 

 

  • High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) (PAR-22-079) Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, NIGMS. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of high-end, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems. The minimum award is $600,001. There is no maximum price limit for the instrument; however, the maximum award is $2,000,000. Instruments supported include, but are not limited to, X-ray diffractometers, high throughput robotic screening systems, mass spectrometers, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, flow cytometers, and biomedical imagers.
     
  • Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) (PAR-22-080) NIGMS. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of high-priced, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated instrumentation system. The minimum award is $50,000. There is no maximum price limit for the instrument; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass spectrometers, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, flow cytometers, and biomedical imagers.

 

  • Limited Competition: Basic Instrumentation Grant (BIG) Program (S10 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) (PAR-22-081) Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, NIGMS. The Basic Instrumentation Grant (BIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase a single high-priced, specialized, commercially available instrument or an integrated instrumentation system. The BIG Program is limited to institutions that have not received S10 instrumentation funding of $250,001 or greater in any of the preceding 3 Federal fiscal years (FY). The minimum award is $25,000. There is no maximum price limit for the instrument; however, the maximum award is $250,000. Instruments supported include, but are not limited to, basic cell sorters, confocal microscopes, ultramicrotomes, gel imagers, or computer systems.

 

 

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

 

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  • EPR BioDose Meeting 2022, March 27-31, 2022; Okayama University of Science, . Abstract submission is now open! Currently planning a hybrid format.  

 

  • RNCP June Meeting Save-The-Date

Radiation-Induced Multi-Organ Injury Workshop (June 7-8, 2022), Rockville, MD. Exposure to ionizing radiation and its ensuing damage has a global impact on the human body. The effects of radiation are pleiotropic, with both acute and chronic changes. The workshop is intended to address multiple organ injury and some of the early effects of radiation that lead to that outcome. This workshop brings together researchers in radiation injury and the medical community to explore radiation-induced multi-organ injury. Presentations and discussions will define multi-organ injury and delineate mechanisms driving injury. The workshop will also highlight currently available animal models and their use in the development of treatment for radiation-induced multi-organ dysfunction. *The intent is to host an in-person workshop and provide a remote attendance option; however, we will also be evaluating the COVID situation to decide if we need to have a virtual workshop*

 

 

  • SAVE THE DATE -  RITN 2022 Workshop: Past Informing the Present Past Improving the Plan. August 4-5, 2022, Alexandria, VA. The Radiation Injury Treatment Network seeks to increase the understanding of and preparedness for the medical, environmental, and psychological consequences of a mass casualty radiological/nuclear incident for healthcare professionals. The 2022 RITN workshop will (1) highlight recent developments in Covid pandemic response and applicable lessons we have learned, (2) review and disseminate novel radiation countermeasures and dosimetry, (3) discuss optimizing triage and on the ground federal resources, (4) present strategies to ensure the availability and appropriate use of medical and psycho-social supportive care and resilience, and (5) explore applying telemedicine as a force multiplier for care and education. Additionally, the workshop will encourage open sharing of lessons learned from past efforts. Abstracts for oral presentation will be accepted beginning in early 2022. Go to www.ritn.net for future updates and announcements.

 

 

 

 

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Article: “Quantitative modeling of carcinogenesis induced by single beams or mixtures of space radiations using targeted and non-targeted effects”

 

Dr. David J Brenner and colleagues propose a modeling approach to enhance current knowledge about quantification of space radiation effects, dose response shapes, and health risks for astronauts. [Sci Rep. 2021 Dec 6.]

 

Igor Shuryak, Rainer K Sachs, David J Brenner

 

 

Read more:

“Quantitative modeling of carcinogenesis induced by single beams or mixtures of space radiations using targeted and non-targeted effects”

 

 

JOB OPENING AND CAREER OPPORTUNITY A close-up of a road sign

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  • Postdoctoral Fellow in Radiation Biology - Northern Ontario School of Medicine. A two-year MITACS funded postdoctoral position is available immediately at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) as part of the Radiation Biology research group (Lead PIs: Dr. Douglas R. Boreham, Dr. T.C. Tai, Dr. Simon Lees, Dr. Christopher Thome and Dr. Sujeenthar Tharmalingam). This position is a collaboration between NOSM, Nuclear Innovation Institute (NII), and SNOLAB. The candidate will lead a team studying the health impacts of natural background radiation and ultralow levels of radiation using our unique deep underground research lab located at SNOLAB